Practitioners and Policymakers' Exchange on Climate Change Adaptation in Agriculture - Frequently Asked Questions Booklet

Report / Paper

Practitioners and Policymakers' Exchange on Climate Change Adaptation in Agriculture - Frequently Asked Questions Booklet

ORGANISER: AKP

PUBLISHED DATE

April 2011

Climate change induced increases in temperature and the variability of rainfall and extreme weather events are projected to influence the occurrence of crop failures, pest and disease outbreaks, and the degradation of land and water resources. These impacts are likely to affect developing countries in South and Southeast Asia especially hard, as they push to expand their agricultural production to support growing populations and pursue income from export markets.

By adapting agricultural systems to become more resilient to climatic trends and changes, losses in production can be reduced. However, the concept of adaptation is still relatively new and practical lessons from agricultural adaptation projects are limited, leaving policy makers in South and Southeast Asian countries often lacking the technical armory to take timely steps toward adaptation. There is a distinct need for agricultural practitioners to further their understanding of climate change adaptation practices.

The ‘Practitioners and Policymakers' Exchange on Climate Change Adaptation in Agriculture’, which was held at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) in Bangkok / Thailand from 30 August to 1 September 2010, aimed to address this need. With 25 practitioners, researchers and policymakers from Bangladesh, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam, the event facilitated the transfer of knowledge gained from increasing experience with adaptation in the agriculture sector. Linkages between different adaptation projects and their management teams were established, access to new research results were facilitated, and resources to support mutual learning and knowledge sharing were provided. Throughout the event, the participants of this exchange were at the center of this learning experience, being at the same time providers and receivers of information.